Retinal vein occlusion linked with a higher risk of dementia

Retinal vein occlusion linked with a higher risk of dementia

Retinal vein occlusion (RVO) may increase the risk of developing dementia, found researchers from the Department of Family Medicine, University College of Medicine, Korea. The findings have been published in the American Journal of Ophthalmology.

The team investigated the association between RVO and subsequent risk of dementia using a cohort comprising 46,259 patients based in Korea. The study design was a retrospective cohort type and was based on the data of participants ≥40 years who underwent health examinations between 2009 and 2010.

The RVO group comprised patients who were initially diagnosed between 2006 and 2010; the comparison group (three per RVO patient; n = 138,777) was selected using propensity score matching according to age, sex, and systolic blood pressure.

In a follow-up of 6.6 years, 14,727 cases of dementia developed. The incidence probabilities for all types of dementia were significantly increased in the RVO group relative to the comparison group, according to the Kaplan-Meier curves (Pc <0.001). After adjusting for all confounding variables, the RVO group exhibited increased risks of subsequent all-cause dementia (HR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.12-1.21), Alzheimer’s disease (1.15, 1.11-1.20), and vascular dementia (1.24, 1.12-1.37) relative to the comparison group.

The findings revealed that the coexistence of RVO with hypertension was associated with a higher risk of dementia. The authors concluded that the presence of RVO was significantly associated with increased risks of all three types of dementia both in hypertensive and non-hypertensive individuals.